Central Auditory Processing Disorder
 
 

Amplify the signal:  FM systems are often recommended to improve the speech-noise ratio for the child.  These devices increase the loudness of the teacher’s auditory signal while minimizing background noise.

Reduce extraneous background noise:  Scan the classroom for sources of background noise that could be reduced or eliminated before beginning to talk (i.e. shut off fans, close door to reduce hallway noise, close windows, etc.).

Allow preferential seating:  To maximize auditory and visual signals, the child should be seated close to the area of verbal instruction.

Simplify verbal instructions:  Limit the amount of information in each instruction.  Present short, focused directions when giving assignments or summarizing information.  Shorten sentences and use less complex vocabulary to describe tasks.

Insure the child’s attention before beginning verbal instruction:  Use attention getting devices, such as calling the student’s name, telling everyone to listen or pay attention before pertinent information (i.e. assignments) and using a physical touch or cue word.

Insure the child’s attention before beginning verbal instruction:  Use attention getting devices, such as calling the student’s name, telling everyone to listen or pay attention before pertinent information (i.e. assignments) and using a physical touch or cue word.

Monitor use of rate, inflection, gestures:  Use body language, facial expression, verbal emphasis and gestures to clarify content.  Alter the inflection, pitch, speaking rate and volume of your voice to emphasize key words and emotional content.

Use visual materials and physical demonstration:  Back up auditory information in other modalities as often as possible to minimize errors in content received.

Ask questions to check comprehension of material presented: Check for understanding using who, what, when, where, and how facts for basic comprehension.  Promote visual imaging of verbal content presented by suggesting that students draw mental pictures of what they hear.